Everybody is brewing over the microbiome, the diverse bacteria that colonize our skin and gut. Microorganisms in our bodies outnumber our own cells by ten to one and contribute to metabolism as well as produce some vitamins. Their enormous impact on our health is just starting to be appreciated. While we’d love to create a genetic report on the topic, almost nothing is known about the interaction of our genes and microbiomes. Here are some fascinating findings on what we know of the microbiome so far:

It is unique to each individual
https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/pr...-fingerprints/

The microbiome temporarily changes through diet but remains stable over life
https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0317145845.htm

It affects gastrointestinal health
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4971820/
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4734998/

It affects mental health
https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog...ics-depression
http://mentalhealthdaily.com/2016/03...-modification/
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25470391
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24997043
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22968153
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4977816/

And it has been associated with CFS
https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0627160939.htm

Two ways to influence the microbiome in the gut are via taking probiotics (purified bacteria) or fecal transplants (a tough pill to swallow)

Probiotics
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3539293/
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4210857/

Fecal transplants
A review http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4419078/